Sunday, October 14, 2012

Feast of Flowers


Every year I look forward to spring with great anticipation. There is just so much going on. Almost every day for six to eight weeks I am almost guaranteed to find something new blooming.

Reading  Bernies BlogHere in my north-eastern corner there are not many discernible seasonal changes, and certainly not much of a noticeable change between our Winter and early Spring.” I am reminded once again how fortunate I am to live where I do.

The Western Cape is home to thousands of plants and a great many of them will flower in spring.

In winter I cleared a neglected patch of the garden and filled it with Felicia amelloides, Plectranthus ecklonii, Pelargonium cucullatum, Pelargonium tormentosum, Pelargonium ? (still trying to positively ID), all the Pelargoniums were from cuttings only the Felicias were bought. I dug up some of the Sutera from other parts of the garden to cover the bare patches and in between I planted purple and white Freesias.

I have been justly rewarded, even though the dogs trampled a few Freesias, there were still enough to enjoy in the garden and enough to pick a few for the vase.

Freesias


Plectranthus neochillus and Pelargonium cucullatum


Felicia and Sutera

Our pavement also got a much needed make over a while ago. Behind the gravel path I have profusion of flowers. Watsonias, pink Freesias, Geranium, Dimorthopeca and more.


Geranium incanum, Watsonia bobonica, Salvia africana-lutea


Freesias, Dimorthopeca, Geranium incanum, 

My final reward for Spring – Guinea fowl chicks. We have always had Guinea fowl in the neighbourhood and this year they laid their eggs across the road in my neighbours garden, but when the chicks hatched they brought them across the road to me. It is great fun watching them run about and they are doing a sterling job of keeping my snail population down. The dogs of course are confined to the back and are not impressed.


14 comments:

  1. Lovely, hopefully not many cats around! You are lucky to have the chicks in the garden.

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  2. The collage of circles technique for presenting your photos is really effective. Oh how I'd love to have Freesias growing like that in my garden! I love Freesias; a vase of them fills the house with scent.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Mark

      Glad you like the circles. I always used Photobucket before, but their collage maker seems to have disappeared. This time I used Pizap and it was really fast and easy. I agree Freesias have an amazing perfume - I love them.

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  3. Lovely mosaics,Freesias are one of my favorite flowers they seem to flower here twice a year.

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    Replies
    1. I am amazed and jealous that your Freesias flower twice. Mine only flower in spring and only last about 4 - 6 weeks.

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  4. how wonderful having wild chicks in the garden. Quite a few of your natives are familiar to me, and grow well here.

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    Replies
    1. Our countries have many similar plants. Unfortunately careless importation has led to many Australian plants becoming invasive, and I think the same is true by you, many of our beautiful flowers are becoming a threat to your own local flora.

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  5. love to see the little fluffballs sheltering in mum's shade. We have 2 cats, so I must admire guineafowl in your garden.

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  6. Replies
    1. Snow on the Helderberg and also in Jonkershoek.

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  7. Hi gardengirl in SA,

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    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Tina

      Looks like a great community, will definitely join. Thanks

      Delete
  8. How cool the Guinea Fowl stutted over to your yard. Do they help with insect populations too? My dog would not be impressed either!

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  9. It's hard to think of a region with so many contributions to horticulture in the warmer regions of the United States. Believe it or not, every now and then I see guinea fowl in older Florida neighborhoods too!

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